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History

Mathew Brady: The Father of Photojournalism

In the middle of July, 1863, a small group of men busily moved across the sweeping terrain of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. One of the men gazed towards a small hill known as Little Round Top, likely battling the sweltering heat as he focused and consulted his notes. Just a few weeks before, Little Round Top was [...]

By |2022-05-18T21:22:53-04:00May 17th, 2022|History|Comments Off on Mathew Brady: The Father of Photojournalism

Tragic Tales at Congressional Cemetery: Suicides

This week, four stories will be shared, all of which focus on people who, sadly, committed suicide. There were a wide range of known reasons why these people each committed suicide, including mental illness, heartbreak, work, and illness. We now have far more resources available for people struggling with suicidal thoughts and mental illness. If [...]

By |2019-07-26T13:38:34-04:00March 15th, 2018|History, Stone Stories, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Tragic Tales at Congressional Cemetery: Suicides

Tragic Tales at Congressional Cemetery: Murder-Suicides

This week’s blog post focuses on murder-suicides. The story of a murder victim in a murder-suicide, and the stories of murderers in two failed murder-suicide attempts will be shared. Love, or infatuation, and jealousy seems to play a role in  several of the stories that have been shared. In several instances, the victim has been a [...]

By |2019-07-26T13:34:44-04:00March 8th, 2018|History, Stone Stories, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Tragic Tales at Congressional Cemetery: Murder-Suicides

Tragic Tales at Congressional Cemetery: Murderers and Murder-Suicides

For the past two weeks, the stories that have been shared focused almost exclusively on murder victims. However, Congressional Cemetery is also the resting place to murderers. Since the line between murderers and murder-suicides isn't clearly defined, partially because many murderers end up committing suicide, murderers and murder-suicides have been grouped together.   Please remember: [...]

By |2019-07-26T13:30:38-04:00March 1st, 2018|History, Stone Stories, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Marguerite Lamott DuPont Lee

When you come across a name such as Marguerite’s, you might expect a certain type of person: blue-blooded, wealthy, and perhaps a little haughty as a result. And to a certain extent, Marguerite Lamott DuPont Lee was very much a product of her prestigious name. Born to the wealthy DuPont family from Delaware and married [...]

By |2019-07-26T13:14:03-04:00December 15th, 2017|History, Uncategorized|4 Comments

Not Written in Stone or Bone

The staff here often refer to cemeteries as outdoor museums. Our “collection” on the grounds consists of over 14,000 headstones, each one in need of proper care and conservation, and each one has a written story to tell. Some stories are more detailed than others, but every headstone is a historical record that memorializes the [...]

By |2019-07-26T12:36:23-04:00August 10th, 2017|History|5 Comments

Adam Gurowski: A Polish Eccentric and Lincoln’s Intellectual Foe

When President Abraham Lincoln told his bodyguard about whom he feared potentially assassinating him the most, it wasn’t the disgruntled, Confederate-sympathizing actor John Wilkes Booth. Rather, it was a somewhat bizarre Polish man who had renounced his old citizenship, became a spokesman for tsarist autocracy in Russia, and ultimately moved to the United States and [...]

By |2019-07-26T12:31:16-04:00July 27th, 2017|History|1 Comment

Not Dead, But Arisen: Victorian Spiritualists in Congressional Cemetery

At a recent Tombs and Tomes book club meeting, the group discussed Mary Roach’s Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife, an apropos selection for a cemetery book club. Roach is a well-known science writer who has delved into a variety of subjects, from dead bodies (Stiff) to the physiology of sex (Bonk), and everything in between. [...]

By |2019-07-26T11:20:23-04:00June 25th, 2015|History|2 Comments

To Limbs Loved and Lost

Civil War buffs and fans of historical trivia know the story well. On July 2, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg, Union General Daniel Sickles was hit in the leg by a cannonball. The severity of the injury necessitated amputation, a common life-saving tactic employed by 19th-century surgeons. The general survived the operation and [...]

By |2019-07-26T11:07:39-04:00March 27th, 2015|History|Comments Off on To Limbs Loved and Lost
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